Rock Art a little history and a little art...

Monday, January 16, 2012

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the MAMMOTH!

Health Advisory for Moses Lake and the greater Columbia Basin:

Are you suffering from...


  • RAPID-ONSET BALDNESS
  • ENLARGED LOWER DENTITION
  • A TENDENCY TOWARDS QUADRUPEDAL MOVEMENT
  • A SUDDEN AVERSION TO MEAT

YOU MAY HAVE MAMMOTH FEVER!

There is no known cure for Mammoth Fever. Repeated exposure to the Moses Lake Museum & Art Center's brand new Columbian Mammoth sculpture may temporarily alleviate symptoms. Do NOT notify your Health Care Professional. They will think you are a nutcase. 





All of us here at the Moses Lake Museum are thrilled to announce the installation of an iconic sculpture by found object sculptor Jud Turner - a full-scale Columbian Mammoth constructed from agricultural implements and tractor parts. For me it is the end of a nearly four year obsession, and a particularly sever case of Mammoth Fever! (Second only to a debilitating case of Weiner-dog-itus!) On Tuesday, January 17 the Mammoth will arrive in Moses Lake - it will be an event of prehistoric proportions!

The mammoth has a long history in Washington. The fossil remains of these creatures have been discovered across Washington State, near Cheney, Moxee, the Olympic Peninsula, Wenas Creek and even Moses Lake! Scientists believe these mammoths entered the America's by way of the Bering Land Bridge 1 million years ago. They ranged from Alaska, across the mid-western United States and south into Mexico and Central America until approximately 10,000 years ago. In 1998 a group of students from Windsor Elementary School near Cheney succeeded in designating the Columbian Mammoth as Washington's State Fossil. The Columbian Mammoth was one of the largest mammoth species that ever lived. Significantly less hairy than it's Woolly cousins, the Columbian Mammoth resembled a large African elephant.


In 1950, Mr. and Mrs. Wesley Kerving of Moses Lake discovered a mammoth femur, scapula and fragmented tusk while building irrigation canals. Moses Lake Museum founder Adam East may have invited the Kervings, or other local shovel bums to display their discoveries at his museum, as photographs show similar mammoth specimens in photos of the Adam East Museum.

 "Hairy Mammouth found near Moses Lake. Let us know of any finds of bones.... largest specimen of the Hairy Mammouth was unearthed at Stratford".

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